BG&RHistory : The Comic

The comic series of Big Guy and Rusty only lasted two books. True. But it’s impact reached back in time and catapulted into the late 1990s. Written by Frank Miller. Artwork by Geof Darrow. Though the comic says they both created the story. Some say everyone has their place in the world.

Well, I believe that amazing creations such as Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot could only be created with collaborating individuals, telling a story. Big Guy and Rusty appears to have been cut short as it seems there were more comics planned and these two were only an introduction. Though with the big print version out today, they can be enjoyed all on their own. And it seems these two have a history working together.

While the animated series focused primarily on Rusty, the comic series was focused more on Big Guy. One BIG difference between the two caught my eye when looking back, was Big Guy himself. Both of the stories feature the same kind of character in Rusty and Big Guy. Though the comic didn’t go into exploring the hidden truth that Big Guy was actually a mech suit piloted by a soldier Dwayne Hunter. I won’t be diving into that until the next BG&RHistory article, so for now, just note that is a big difference.

The comics were published in 1996. The first comic’s story focused on Rusty being sent off to fight a giant monster in Japan. Reminiscent of Astro Boy – there was even an Astro Boy art cameo.Each page of art is like a “seek and find” art book, where you have to find everything that’s hidden in plain sight. Everything you see you might have to look over again to find something you didn’t notice before.

A nuke – for example – could be funded by McDonald’s and at first glance you wouldn’t see that. And when you look again it becomes a laughable moment.

Big Guy in this story is called out from the USA to defend the world from a monster in Japan. The monster acts like a hive mind of goop that is destructive and controlling. Demonically trying to take over the entire globe. It’s goals – while sinister – have no clear motivation. This is a common thing within the world of Big Guy and Rusty. Apparently the goal was to provide a nostalgic monster movie cliche experience while providing original characters such as the goof of a robot sidekick and a serious robot man.

To me, the story has always felt like a father and son tale. Even though Rusty would technically be adopted, this role of father towards son/apprentice seems consistent in both the animated series and the comic.

Each page of art is like a “seek and find” art book, where you have to find everything that’s hidden in plain sight. Everything you see you might have to look over again to find something you didn’t notice before.

A nuke – for example – could be funded by McDonald’s and at first glance you wouldn’t see that. And when you look again it becomes a laughable moment.

Big Guy in this story is called out from the USA to defend the world from a monster in Japan. The monster acts like a hive mind of goop that is destructive and controlling. Demonically trying to take over the entire globe. It’s goals – while sinister – have no clear motivation. This is a common thing within the world of Big Guy and Rusty. Apparently the goal was to provide a nostalgic monster movie cliche experience while providing original characters such as the goof of a robot sidekick and a serious robot man.

To me, the story has always felt like a father and son tale. Even though Rusty would technically be adopted, this role of father towards son/apprentice seems consistent in both the animated series and the comic.

Do you remember this comic set? Did you feel the pain of the inexperienced Rusty the boy robot (despite lacking pain receptors).

Let us know what this comic means to you in the comments, or contact our Facebook page. We love sharing the passion for robots throughout science fiction.

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